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Was it a “horny dinosaur” of turtles?

Was it a “horny dinosaur” of turtles?

Zurich: A research team comprised of scientists from Switzerland, Colombia, Venezuela and Brazil has discovered the ancient fossil turtles (fossils) in the Venezuelan and Colombian desert, weighing approximately 1200kg, with a hard shell measuring 2.4 meters by 2.4 meters. Meters. These turtles found in fresh water also had horns on male shells.

The turtle, which disappeared some five million years ago, has been nicknamed “Stupendemys geographicus”, whose earliest records were discovered in the 1970s. It was a bit of fresh water.

Recent research has revealed many more obstacles for this giant turtle, some of which are also quite complete.

Experts say that the current desert areas of Colombia and Venezuela used to be lush and picturesque millions of years ago, where rivers, lakes and ponds, as well as swamps, were present. In the past there have also been discoveries of various types of giant crocodile crocodiles, as well as the bites of mummified animals, but the discovery of giant turtles is unique and important in many respects.

Experts estimate based on current freshwater turtles, the neck of the stoopendymis was left out of the middle, rather than right or left. Regarding the horns raised on male turtle shells, scientists say that this turtle probably used them to fight male turtles in the fight for mating for genocide. Besides, these horns probably helped him compete with his most dangerous enemy, the giant crocodile-like beast.

Physiological analysis and comparison of turtle evolutionary tree experts have concluded that the nearest surviving relative of stapendymosis is the Amazon River Turtle, whose head is significantly larger than the rest of its body. However, it weighs about 12kg, while the standpondimose weighs 100 times more.

Recent studies also reinforce the notion that stop opandemis was not confined to just a few areas, but was found throughout the southern United States.

Details of this inaugural discovery have been published online in the latest issue of the research journal “Science Advances.”

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